Getting ready for HTML5 components – Part 1

WebUI Studio 2012 R1 has been released a month ago and we’ve developed several new controls and enhancements to the existing controls. As you know, we already delivered WebGrid 8 and WebCombo 6 in the release which includes full support for HTML5 and CSS3.

For the R2 release, we’re putting major efforts on supporting HTML5 to the rest of our ASP.NET components, including the 30+ WebDesktop UI components and WebEssentials suite.  Even though HTML5 is still in the development phase, nowadays many developers are speeding up their web development to HTML5 technology. Looking into HTML5 capability and advantages, it’s surely promising for web development in the future.

Layouting in HTML5

The biggest challenge that we found during development in HTML5 is its layout. Rendering layout in HTML5 is more complex than HTML4. Based on HTML5 discussion forum, in order to make the layout’s size in percentage (%), the parent level height must be defined as well. Mostly, both <html> and <body> tags are set to 100% for its height.

We realize that WebDesktop structures are mostly using table. However, using table is not recommended because it has a limitation in HTML5. Therefore, we decided to revamp/modify WebDesktop’s structures to fit user’s requirement.

In this first series of my blog post, I’ll be sharing our experiences on the HTML5 development for the 2 members of WebDesktop family, WebCallOut and WebTab. Let’s take a deep look of what we’re currently doing with them.

Rendering WebCallOut

The first time when we convert WebCallOut to HTML5, we got numerous issues with the layout such as shown below.

WebCallOut's layout issue when using HTML5.

WebCallOut's pointer offset when using HTML5.

Notice that the rendering is completely messed up, and the pointer is also offset from the correct position.

After improving the control to support HTML5, the layout and rendering now shows perfect results, such as shown below.

WebCallOut's perfect layout after modified.

WebCallOut's pointer displays correctly after modified.

In the HTML5 migration, we tried our best to achieve pixel-identical results when comparing to the HTML4 implementation. So, if you host the control back to HTML4 doc type, the results will be identical – all with the same codebase.

Rendering WebTab

For the WebTab control, we decided to revamp the structure only for the content because the content itself needs to be in fluid. You’ll see numerous layout issues when using WebTab control in HTML5 such as shown below.

WebTab's structure issue when using HTML5.

During the research phase, we found that the usage of table no longer support fluid content in HTML5. The percentage height of fluid content is getting smaller or rather bigger than its container. When we tried to specify height in fluid content to pixels, it works like charm. Unfortunately, this method makes WebTab’s performance slower than before. Ultimately, we decided to revamp the entire rendering structure and no longer using table as the container to achieve the fluid layout.

WebTab's perfect structure after modified.

In addition, our team pay detailed attention on the UI aspects such as the tab header position and alignment, fixing the animation for active and normal tab header, adjusting style for complex image, and improving the style caused by the tab header’s height.

The tab header that uses complex images will also produce undesired results, which is caused by the table structure that involves multiple rows, shown below.

WebTab's complex images issue when using HTML5.

Thankfully, we found that it is possible to use one row in order to fix the WebTab and put additional final touching. After applying the new technique, the WebTab control now renders perfectly.

WebTab renders complex images perfectly after modified.

Hopefully this post gives you insights and big picture of what we’re doing for the HTML5 initiatives. I will share our development progress for the other controls in the next series of blog posts. So, be sure to keep updated with the next series of our development story.

Cheers,
Handy

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2 thoughts on “Getting ready for HTML5 components – Part 1

  1. Pingback: Introducing WebDesktop 4 – Final Part | Intersoft Solutions Corporate Blog

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